Social Issues

Pride Month: History, Traditions And All You Need To Know About Pride!

Everyone deserve a chance at love!

Megavarshini S G

Pride Month, a month where the LGBTQ celebrate themselves, embrace their genders, fill their lives with more love and happiness and finally breathe fresh air.  LGBTQ community have been put through hell for years, harassed, subjugated and thwarted. Even in the 90’s people weren’t more open to this community of people. ‘It didn’t really exist, there wasn’t really any such thing.’ Of course everyone was still at it. It’s just people met, loved and cared each other secretly.

Every year in June, world celebrates Pride month in honor of the LGBTQ community members and this month is all about teaching acceptance, pride in one’s sexual identity and most importantly love. Global Pride Day is celebrated on June 28, colorful parades, massive rallies, marches and events are held across the globe to attract participants. Dolled up, glittering the LGBTQ community flaunt their love, happiness and freedom in style.

Here’s all you need to know about Pride!

History:

 

 

It all started with the Stonewell Uprising in New York City on June 28, 1969. Following the invasion of police in Gay Bar located in Greenwich Village, riots, demurs, protests ensued throughout the city. Marsha P Johnson, a black, Trans and a bisexual woman led the movement and carried it forward for the next six days. People from different parts of the world endorsed this movement. This fight brought a revolutionary change in the world.

Pride Month was officially fledged by bisexual activist Brenda Howard, ‘The Mother of Pride’. After a year of Stonewall Riots, she organized a Gay Pride Week and Christopher Street Liberation Day. This acted as a catalyst and now we have the resplendent and glorious Pride marches, festivities and celebrations.

The Stonewall Inn was declared a historic landmark by the city of New York in 2015 and later named a national monument by President Barack Obama in 2016.

Rainbow Symbolism:

 

 

During the Pride month, people proudly carry rainbow flags in their rallies and festivities in June. They represent it as a symbol of LGBTQ pride.

In 1978, a gay man and a drag queen Gilbert Baker designed a flag to support their mission, which is to come out of the lie and live an open life. Rainbow, a natural flag from the sky with its eight colors and stripes was adopted. Each color had its significance, Hot pink – Sex, Red – Life, Orange – Healing, Yellow – Sunlight, Green – Nature, Turquoise – Art, Indigo – Harmony and Violet – Spirit. Later, due to the production issues two strips were removed and now the most commonly used variant of the rainbow flag has six stripes with Red, the color which stands first in the actual rainbow, orange, yellow, green, blue and violet. Colors in the flag represent togetherness, as LGBTQ come in all races, sexes, genders.

The internationally acknowledged and beautiful rainbow flag is used by the LGBTQ in promising times and also in crisis.

Pride Traditions:

 

 

Typically involve a series of events and is capped by parade of marchers. LGBTQ’s fears, vulnerabilities and oppressions are confronted and a sense of inclusiveness arises in this Pride march. The parade seek to create community and honor the history of the movement. Commemorations and memorials are held for people who lost their lives to hate crimes. Campaigns and rallies to promote the history and also the well-being of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans queers. Just wear your colors, grab a rainbow, bisexual or Trans flag and go dance, run or walk in the parade with Pride!

Pride 2021:

 

 

Last year marked the 50th anniversary of Pride Month. Due to pandemic, the celebrations, love and happiness were shared virtually. This year, parade events may resume in person depending on the viral spread and place you live. However, most of the celebrations are happening online. Celebrate Pride virtually: Support Pride organizations by donating, host a Pride movie night, hang a Pride flag outside your place, embrace and spread love.

There’s always a way to shower Love!

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